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the Schott Infra-Med 810 heat lamp was assumed to stimulate the metabolism and improve the circulation of blood
Schott Infra-Med 810 heat lamp
PAIN-RELIEF-AND-WOUND-HEALING
The therapeutic application of infrared
radiation was mainly based on stimulation
of tissues below the upper part of the
skin. The rise of temperature caused by
infrared radiation from devices like the
Schott Infra-Med 810 heat lamp on
display here, was assumed to stimulate
the metabolism and improve the
circulation of blood. This radiation
supported the natural process of healing
and relieved pain in some situations. The
accomplishment of a more than
superficial rise in temperature required
the use of a type of infrared radiation that
was able to penetrate the upper skin. For this objective infrared radiation in the
range between 700 and 1400 nanometer, the area of near infrared, had proven to be
the most suitable. The highest absorption occured at wavelengths around 1200
nanometer and was mainly determined by the characteristics of blood and other
liquids just below the skin. Radiation with wavelengths outside this working area was
almost completely absorbed at a depth from 1 to 1,5 millimeters and mainly caused an
increase of temperature of the upper skin. Radiation with a wavelength of about
1200 nanometers caused an increase in temperature from a few degrees Celsius
unto a depth of 8 to 10 millimeters which was most effective for the relieve of pain in
muscles and joints. Radiation with a wavelength of about 900 nanometers penetrated
less deep but contained more energy making it better suitable for the treatment of
superficial wounds.
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